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Summer growth of table grapes in Northern Missouri

This season's weather has included an abundent amount of precipitation; hence it is looking to be a bumper corn crop in Missouri.  Chariton County located in the north central part of the state has fared well when it concerns rain; abundent but not too much to flood out the crops.  The soy bean harvest is still up in the air at this point, but the corn harvest looks to be a confirmed good one. Gardens have seen the appearance of the dreaded Japanese beetle.  These beetles were in my table grape vineyard in Mendon, MO, which means they will most likely only get worse in the future.  Worse than the beetles was the damage in my vineyard due to 2-4-D herbicide spray drift from the surrounding corn and soybean fields.  I opine that every town in the Midwest should have table grapes planted only if to be indicators of herbicide drift into our communities where we live.  Grapes in particular are very sensitive to herbide drift and exhibit damaged leaves and twisted shoots that are easilly identifiable.  Grapes are like a canary in a coal mine when it comes to alerting us of high levels of herbicide drift.  The grape cultivers Mars, Vanessa, Neptune, Venus, Canadice, Concord, Van Buren, America,and  Sunbelt were negatively impacted by glyphosphate and various 2-4-D herbicide drift.  The grape varieties Price, Steuben, Reliance, Joy, and Edeilweis showed some resistance.  One older variety from the University of Arkansas breeding program called Mars was almost killed from the spray drift.  I will post some further updates on spray drift resistant table grape varieties from my home vineyard in Chariton County, Missouri in the future. When you live in such a friendly town as Mendon and in such a pretty part of Missouri as Chariton County who can complain?  We have had such a moist summer that the table grapes have mostly rebounded after being poisoned and have made excellent growth with one vine of Steuben actuallly reaching over ten feet high and wide that began as a small transplant this spring! Happy gardening and good luck farming!